Fixing Tire Nail Punctures is as Easy as 1-2-3

No one wants to step outside and discover a tire on their care or truck has gone flat. Nor does anyone hope to find a nail, or screw embedded deep within the tire tread. Unfortunately, nail punctures are common with motor vehicles and bicycles.

Fortunately, fixing tire nail punctures takes a bit of time and know how. Auto tire repair kits cost around ten dollars or less. Most come with all the tools and ingredients needed to repair a puncture made from a nail, or other thin pointed objects. Such a kit should be kept on hand just in case, but if not they are available at auto stores, gas stations and some department stores and come as temporary, or permanent repair kits. Temporary kits are useful for when a spare tire is unavailable and the owner wants to drive the vehicle straight to the mechanics.

Those intimidated by the process of fixing tires have no need to worry. Reputable auto shop mechanics are used to fixing tire nail punctures and will do it for you at reasonable prices. A mechanic will examine the tire and explain whether or not he, or she, is able to permanently mend it. This is done in a short amount of time.

Since how quickly the tire gets fixed depends more on the mechanic’s schedule rather than the job itself, the vehicle owner might want to consider fixing tire nail punctures him, or herself. In that case, the tire plug method is preferred do its simplicity and long lasting use.

Fixing tire nail punctures needs a tire plug kit, a means of putting air back into the tire, such as a bicycle tire pump, and tire sealer like fix-a-flat. Tire plug kits come either with a tube of rubber cement, or tubeless. Both forms have their uses and produce satisfactory results. Kits also include a rasp tool, a large eyed needle tool, and long strips of sticky tar or rubber plugs.

To start fixing tire nail punctures first remove the tire, replacing it with a spare if available. Locate the foreign object and mark the area to find the exact spot once the nail is removed. Now it is time to remove the nail. If loose it can be done by hand, but a pair of pliers may be needed to grip and pull the nail out. The rasp tool has file like marks on it. This tool is used to clean and smooth out the sides of the hole before inserting the plug. Once this is done, add the rubber cement to the hole. Then thread a plug strip through the needle and insert into the hole. Once a small portion of the plug is visible, about half an inch, remove the needle and let the plug set up. Read the instructions to find out how long this part takes. Once ready, the only thing to do is fill the tire with air.